Archive for the 'construction' Category

.32ach

July 18, 2013

we recently performed our final air-tightness test at skidmore passivhaus with a result of .32ach at 50pa.

we are extremely pleased that our clear air-barrier strategy and diligent execution paid off.

here’s a snapshot of our final phpp #’s:

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there is no doubt that achieving passive house, particularly in our climate, is fairly easily achievable.  it does require smart design, careful planning, a contractor that understands and pays attention, and a healthy dose of persistence.  if you are ready to build one for yourself, drop us a line at info@insituarchitecture.net.

more pictures and info coming soon.

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nearing completion

June 8, 2013

after almost a year of construction we are excited to say skidmore passivhaus is nearing completion.  it’s come a long ways since this.  here are a few recent shots of the interiors coming together.

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more news, pictures, and the details coming soon.

www.insituarchitecture.net

fast forward

May 20, 2013

we’ve been too busy to post for quite awhile, but work has been progressing nicely on the skidmore house.  here’s a quick look around:

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we hope to be putting the final touches on in the next few weeks.  lots of catching up to do.  check back soon for more on this project and others.

www.insituarchitecture.net

suck and blow

March 27, 2013

rough-in work has wrapped up on skidmore passivhaus and it’s time to look at a few of the features under the hood. this new airtight home (or shall we say leak-free) is equipped with mechanical lungs.

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we chose the PH certified zehnder comfoair 200 hrv, capable of producing up to 125 cfm of continuous ventilation.  this project requires about 70 cfm (60% setting) to achieve .31 air changes per hour (or roughly 1 air change every 3 hours).

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the 3″ flexible ductwork is a double-walled proprietary system called comfotube made by zehnder.  very easy and fast to install.  the goal is to keep the runs as short and straight as possible.

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the round ceiling rough-in boxes are used for either supply or exhaust air.  either 1 tube or 2 tubes are connected depending on the cfm requirements.  exhausts are located in the bathrooms (20 cfm continuous) and kitchen (30 cfm continuous).  we have 3 exhaust locations – each with 2 tubes.  there are 4 supply locations.

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supply air is typically provided at the ceilings but we have a low supply register in the double height living room.

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the tubing terminates in the ceiling of the mechanical room.  6 supply tubes and 6 exhaust tubes.  manifolds gather the supply and exhaust tubes respectively and connect them to the unit.

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exhaust air flows through the machine, the heat is captured in the core, and the air is expelled to the outside.

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fresh air is brought into the machine from the exterior, and warmed by the heat captured from the outgoing air.  the zehnder is about 92% efficient and uses just 7.1 watts / cfm.

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the fresh air supply and exhaust are ducted in well insulated metal ductwork from the bottom of the unit to the exterior.  the fresh air supply is located high on the exterior wall with the exhaust about 10′ below.  the duct penetrations were carefully air sealed to the plywood air-barrier.  this unit also requires a condensate drain that we’ve tied with an air gap into the kitchen waste pipe.

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the main controller will be located in the kitchen, providing the ability to boost the ventilation rate temporarily to 35 cfm while cooking.  each bathroom will have a timed switch to boost the rate to 24 cfm if needed after a shower.  we also conveniently have an operable window located in the kitchen and both showers.

thanks to IM Plumbing for help with the installation, and to Matt Grove from Zehnder for help with the design.

sheetrock has wrapped up and painting has begun.  check back soon for more.

www.insituarchitecture.net

blow

February 19, 2013

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stained cedar siding

February 10, 2013

siding work has mostly wrapped up.  the vertical siding is installed on rainscreen over rigid exterior insulation.  see this past post for more info on the assembly.

here’s a first look at the siding pretty much completed.

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the siding is off the shelf 1×6 channel made from tight knot cedar.  it’s stained with 1 coat of olympic semi-transparent stain in ebony.

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the large south windows (and doors) have exterior motorized aluminum sun shades supplied by hella.  the siding has been detailed to allow the shades to stack in recessed pockets.  in this photo the shades are down about 9 inches and just visible on the 2 living room units (lift / slide door and fixed upper unit).  more on the shading later.

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the “breezeway” features a south facing door / window with a wood canopy (to be painted black) topped with clear tempered glass.

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the entry door at left features acid etched glass for privacy and has a smooth accent panel adjacent that will be painted a deep red.  the wood canopy will painted black and features a simple galvanized metal pan roof.  steel rod will be used to hang the canopy from a bracket mounted to the wall above.  a mahogany deck will eventually complete the front porch.

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the north street facade also features a narrow smooth accent panel that will be painted with the same deep red.  the same siding runs horizontally to form an accent between floors.

check back soon for more.

www.insituarchitecture.net

stair progresses

January 4, 2013

while most of the attention has been focused on the insulation, windows and air sealing, the interior stair has made slow but steady progress.

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stringers are tube steel bolted to concrete landing and wood wall

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tread risers are 1/8″ thick bent plate steel

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everything is fit up and welded in place

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guardrail is 1″ sq tube steel verticals

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steel will be left natural with all the signs of fabrication exposed

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a clear coat will be applied at completion

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still more to go but we think it’s coming along nicely.

thanks to alameda metal works for their fine work.

thermal bridge free exterior

December 31, 2012

next up on skidmore passivhaus is installing the outsulation on the walls along with the rainscreen furring.

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the plywood sheathing was first covered by a weather resistive barrier with metal head flashings at the windows and doors.

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most walls get a layer of 3″ poly-iso, while the south wall will get 4″ to match the recessed pocket for the exterior shades.

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2 screws (with plastic washer) per 4×8 sheet hold it in place until the furring strips are installed.

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all seams and fasteners are taped.  the face of the insulation is treated as a second weather resistive barrier.

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additional flashings at all doors and windows will be taped to the insulation as the wood trim is installed.

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1/2″ x 2″ pt plywood furring strips run vertically to create the drainage plane.  they are held in place by just a few fasteners until the next layer is installed.

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since we are using vertical siding, a second layer of furring runs horizontally.  we used pt 1×4 as a solid nailing base for the siding.

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long fasteners secure the second layer of furring strips running horizontally through the foam to the studs.  the straightforward framing layout makes the studs much easier to locate.

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keep in mind that long fasteners get expensive.  we settled on grabber #10 x 6″ square drive coated screws (from nw staple).

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next up on the exterior is trimming windows and installing siding.

stop by again soon.

foundation foam

December 30, 2012

while there’s a lot of talk these days about building without foam, we decided early on to use continuous rigid board foam outsulation for this project.  to begin the foundation gets 4″ of expanded polystyrene.

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these 8′ long pieces are held in place at the bottom by backfill and at the top by concrete spikes.  spray foam was first applied to the back of the pieces to fill gaps and help secure them.

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the concrete spikes are recessed into the foam to minimize thermal bridging.  only 3 spikes were used per 8′ long piece.

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step 1: use hole saw bit and pry out hunk of foam.

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step 2: use hammer drill to drill hole in foundation.

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step 3: prepare 6″ concrete spike and plastic washer.  (concrete spike from dealers supply / plastic washer from service partners supply)

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step 4: hammer spike and washer to secure foam.

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step 5: spray foam any gaps

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step 6: reinstall foam plug using spray foam as adhesive

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when the weather warms we will be applying a cementitious coating direct to the foam to provide the finished surface.  after final grading, only 6″ or so will be exposed to view.

waiting for guffman (or looking through windows – part 8)

December 2, 2012

when we began this process, we only had a few rules.  one of them was real wood high performance windows.

at the conception of this project, we were thinking about making a pretty good house.  Super insulated, airtight, with triple glazed windows and a heat recovery ventilator, but not necessarily passivhaus.  since we ruled out plastic or fiberglass, US built windows were at the top of the list.  once we decided to build to passivhaus, it quickly became clear that we had to look overseas.

our initial pricing was from optiwin, internorn, and pazen.  optiwin was very appealing aesthetically but super expensive.  internorn provided fantastic pricing, but there was no rep in the US meaning distant communications and pretty much zero support. pazen offers a slightly different product with a fiberglass exterior cladding and more minimal frame profiles, but they only offered a stainless steel clad door.  because we had lots of doors, the price jump was huge and they were way out of our budget.

about the same time, our local loewen rep started offering unilux.  we visited another local passivhaus project to see them installed, and we were impressed.  the pricing was strong, and we felt most comfortable having a rep locally, although they only had a limited understanding of passivhaus.  we thought we’d made up our mind, until we stumbled onto zola windows.  nearly identical to the german and austrian made passivhaus windows, zola windows are manufactured in poland and offered at a much more competitive price point.  we worked through all the options, input the data into PHPP, and scrutinized the sample window section that we got our hands on.  it seemed like a good balance between quality, aesthetics, and price point.  decision made.

one of the biggest challenges of using european windows is the long lead time (for our order the lead time was estimated at 12-16 weeks).  we worked hard to have our window order ready to go by the time we were breaking ground.  once we placed the order, the race was on to make sure the house was ready when the windows finally arrived.  18 WEEKS LATER they finally arrived. when we finally opened the container door to check them out, 2 of the biggest units had broken free from their braces and had fallen over at somepoint during shipping.  while nothing was catastrophic, there were issues both functional and aesthetic.

fast forward 6 weeks.  zola has been super responsive and we’re confident that in the end everything will be as good as new.  the windows and doors are installed and are beautiful.  the house is dry, the first blower door test went well (.44ach at 50pa), and we are steadily moving toward insulation and sheetrock.

here’s a quick look at some of the process. first, prepping the rough openings:

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step 1 – use pink prosoco joint and seam filler at corners and joints of rough opening.

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step 2 – use red prosoco fast flash to coat rough opening and extend approx. 6″ out onto sheathing.

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to apply these prosoco products, simply lay down a bead from a caulking gun and spread with a cheap plastic spreader.  the result is a waterproof, airtight, and vapor permeable flashing without the usual complications of peel and stick flashings.  of course no through wall metal flashings on a passivhaus.

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next, windows arrive and are unloaded.

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not what you want to see when you open the door of the container.  i think they forgot to do the ACTUAL bracing at the factory.

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some of these units are HEAVY!  thank to Doug Marshak and his Awesome Framing Crew for doing the very heavy lifting.

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small tilt/turn unit for the kitchen.

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Doug and Jesus installing the small window in the 2 story living room.

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the big units waiting to be installed.

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after a few nervous hours, the biggest unit finally goes in.  thanks to Graeme Thomson for the smart hoisting method.

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the large fixed unit installed above the lift/slide door.

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front door with translucent glass and large window to the street.

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breezeway with tilt/turn terrace door and fixed sidelite.

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studio with tilt/turn door and fixed sidelite.

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check back soon for more as we try to catch up with construction: HRV rough-in, steel stair installation, flashing the windows, installing the exterior insulation, and rainscreen furring.