Posts Tagged ‘northwest architect’

stained cedar siding

February 10, 2013

siding work has mostly wrapped up.  the vertical siding is installed on rainscreen over rigid exterior insulation.  see this past post for more info on the assembly.

here’s a first look at the siding pretty much completed.

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the siding is off the shelf 1×6 channel made from tight knot cedar.  it’s stained with 1 coat of olympic semi-transparent stain in ebony.

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the large south windows (and doors) have exterior motorized aluminum sun shades supplied by hella.  the siding has been detailed to allow the shades to stack in recessed pockets.  in this photo the shades are down about 9 inches and just visible on the 2 living room units (lift / slide door and fixed upper unit).  more on the shading later.

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the “breezeway” features a south facing door / window with a wood canopy (to be painted black) topped with clear tempered glass.

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the entry door at left features acid etched glass for privacy and has a smooth accent panel adjacent that will be painted a deep red.  the wood canopy will painted black and features a simple galvanized metal pan roof.  steel rod will be used to hang the canopy from a bracket mounted to the wall above.  a mahogany deck will eventually complete the front porch.

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the north street facade also features a narrow smooth accent panel that will be painted with the same deep red.  the same siding runs horizontally to form an accent between floors.

check back soon for more.

www.insituarchitecture.net

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beach house

May 13, 2012

we recently made a visit to the coast to have a look at the oceanside beach house.

designed in 2010, the owners have been completing the house in their spare time.

www.insituarchitecture.net

forest lane residence

March 28, 2012

we recently whipped up a design proposal for a new residence in the northwest hills of portland.  we had a great time with it but unfortunately it looks like this one will be staying on the shelf.  let us know if you want to take it for a spin.

www.insituarchitecture.net

beach house interior

May 19, 2011

we made a quick visit to oceanside to check in on the construction progress over the last few months.  the owners are doing most of the work themselves, and they’ve been moving along steadily on the interior.  the spaces are starting to take shape, colors are getting introduced, and this little beach house is starting to come to life.

www.insituarchitecture.net

passivhaus progression

April 7, 2011

as we inch closer to getting started on our project, we continue to scrutinize our current plans in an effort to create a house that is fine tuned for our needs.  as an architect, i want a house that is inspiring and beautiful, and embodies what is important to us.  as the owner with a very limited budget, we want to make sure that our cost expectations are realistic.  since i’ll be playing general contractor, i want an easy to construct and problem free building.

we’ve taken another pass at redesigning the house with an eye toward efficiency and simplicity – both in terms of square footage and energy.  we felt there were a few redundancies, tricky details, and program pieces that we are better off without.  here’s a quick snapshot of the progression of the plans.

as always, there are a few ideas though that we refuse to give up.

requirement #1: warm, comfortable, and extremely energy efficient

we want to live simply and in a beautiful inspiring place that is warm and comfortable regardless of the time of year.  we also want to minimize our footprint and our energy costs.  although we will most likely pursue passivhaus certification, the path we take isn’t really as important as the end result.  for us, passivhaus is just a means to a better end.  our generous friends at brute force collaborative have been providing the expertise to help us get there.

meeting passivhaus requirements means the house will use no more than 4.75 kBTU / ft2 annually for space heating.  for the main house, this translates to about 5.27 mBTU or 1544 kWh annually for space heating (we are planning to use electricity to heat the house).  at our current rate of around $.09 / kWh, our annual heating bill would be no more than $139.

although we know that the studios will see far less use than the main house, using the same formula yields an annual heating bill for the studios of no more than $51.

requirement #2: wood windows and doors

since we want wood windows and doors, and they need to be extremely high performing to achieve requirement #1, we have been looking at manufacturers based in germany and austria.  this is our largest single expense and perhaps an easy target for criticism, as these beauties will need to be shipped overseas.  we would love to use a locally produced product, but unfortunately no wood windows made in the US come even close in terms of performance.  it’s a bit of a quandary, but brute force collaborative has performed an interesting analysis (based on our previous design) that has us feeling more comfortable with our decision: Can European windows actually save carbon?

requirement #3: separate work from home

an important part of our program is space to do work and make things.  we know we could make a more cost effective and thermally efficient house if we combined our work space with our home, but we like the idea of some separation.  we think we can make this simple idea a huge asset.

requirement #4: create positive outdoor space

our intention has always been to use the form of the house to shape outdoor space.  again, this may contradict requirement #1 but we don’t just want a box sitting in the landscape.  we want two boxes sitting in the landscape creating positive space between!

requirement #5: keep it modest and make it beautiful

many people may not agree, but we think these two wood clad boxes with concrete floors, white sheetrock walls, natural wood doors and windows, and flooded with light will be quite beautiful.

on the boards: BUG

February 27, 2011

Beech Urban Gardens is a new mixed-use building designed to meet passivhaus standards and substantially raise the bar on energy efficiency.  Located at the heart of the burgeoning N Williams corridor, BUG sits on an empty south facing 50′ x 120′ corner lot.  Seven residential units occupy the top two floors, while six creative offices are situated above three ground floor retail spaces.

BUG features a fully glazed south facade utilizing a high-performance window system to maximize direct solar gain, minimize heat loss, and provide exceptional views and daylight.  A system of sliding wood shutters is incorporated into the facade to provide complete external shading in the summer and eliminate overheating, while still allowing views and daylight.

The roof features a community garden with raised beds and a potting shed, a huge terrace with views to the neighborhood and the city, and photovoltaic panels making the roof’s south guardrail and providing the building’s minimal electrical needs.  A greywater recycling storage tank provides gravity fed water for the rooftop gardens and the building below.

interior of typical residential unit

southwest view with wooden shutters in closed position

www.insituarchitecture.net

a break from the rain

January 5, 2011

yesterday we took advantage of the recent stretch of dry weather to visit our project under construction at the coast.

the exterior siding is installed and awaits a few final details and paint.  the body and trim will be painted a dark warm grey and should recede nicely into the landscape.

the open stair is flooded with south light and draws you up from the entry into the main volume of the house.

the spectacular view to the west required a nice long deck to take it all in after a hard day of playing on the beach (insert drink in hand).

the tiny east elevation.

the cozy bedroom tucked into the east end.

the future 3-star ping pong room on the lower level.

a small taste of the main living room – more on this space later.

the bathroom with soaking tub and skylight above.

the west elevation in its partially finished state.

the north entry elevation from the road.

for more on the construction process so far, see the previous posts here, here, and here.

for more on the design, see the previous posts here and here.

www.insituarchitecture.net

context

December 23, 2010

the software is free and the skills are rudimentary.

but i still enjoy seeing some context.

skidmore passive house

more after the break.

in situ architecture

passivehaus planning

December 19, 2010

we’re planning a passivehaus.  for a quick intro see the previous post.  our desire is to create a modern sustainable house that suits our modest needs and lifestyle.  our site is a 50′ x 140′ flat lot with the street to the north, and great south exposure to the back.  we want a 2 bedroom house for us, our animals, and the occasional guest.  in addition, we need a small architecture office with direct client access, a small art studio with internal access, and a workshop with storage.  living and working all in one.

our solution:

the plan takes a simple rectangle composed of the three primary program pieces, pulls it apart into two volumes, and shifts the smaller volume to form south facing outdoor space on grade and a roof terrace accessed from the second floor.  the gap between serves to break down the mass from the street by allowing views through to the back, while providing separate access to the office.  although the simple shifts in plan create more surface area and a less efficient envelope, we feel the spatial effect is important and justifies the added effort and cost.

service functions such as bathrooms, laundry, storage, and kitchen are placed to the north (shown in gray).  a two-story living room and architecture office are placed to the south on the ground floor; each with direct access to the south yard.  the art studio is placed to the south on the upper floor with direct access to a roof terrace.

openings are primarily located to the south to maximize solar gain, while openings on the north are sized to satisfy the code minimum for street side glazing.  east and west openings are limited to minimize heat loss, while providing a balance of light and natural ventilation.  exterior roll down shades will be outfitted on the south facing openings to prevent overheating during the hottest days.  exterior materials include aluminum clad wood windows, charred juniper siding, and cement stucco.

view from the south (back)

interior looking south through living room

with our preliminary design in hand, our generous friends at brute force collaborative crunched the numbers using the passive house planning package, and have verified that we can achieve the passivhaus standard.  check back soon for a first look at the assemblies and details that will make it all possible.

www.insituarchitecture.net

beach house continues

November 12, 2010

roof is on.  windows are in.  framing is up.  decking is down.

pictures are here:

www.insituarchitecture.net